Strategies for Enhancing Resilience - And a "Quick to Recover" Self-Test
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FYI

Strategies for Enhancing Resilience - And a "Quick to Recover" Self-Test

The concept of resilience is a huge theme in the field of Positive Psychology.

A quick overview of the concept of resilience at Psychology Today notes that factors associated with resilience include:

  • a positive attitude,
  • optimism,
  • the ability to regulate emotions, and 
  • the ability to see failure as a form of helpful feedback.

This APA Help Center site suggests that resilience is "the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy, threats" and other stressors - and bouncing back from those events - and suggests that readers can enhance their own resilience by:


  • developing close relationships,
  • adapting how we view change or even acute stress,
  • moving towards important goals,
  • use stressors as opportunities for learning more about ourselves, and
  • self-care.

At the Mayo Clinic's health information page, the authors add that being proactive (don't ignore problems or wish them away) and making every day meaningful are additional practical strategies for enhancing our resilience.
Sydney psychologist Lyn Worsley has developed a model - the Resilience Doughnut - for teaching kids about resilience.   The model identifies important resilience-supporting factors:

  • The Parent Factor
  • The Skill Factor: .
  • The Family and Identity Factor
  • The Education Factor
  • The Peer Factor
  • The Community Factor
  • The Money Factor

The Resilience Doughnut model emphasizes that while we may be strong in one factor, we might notice other factors which are weaknesses for us.  What matters is developing and maintaining the factors over which we have some control.

How about you?  How resilient are you?  The Daily Beast offers this quiz for assessing how quickly you bounce back after a hassle or stressor.  I've never seen this quiz used in a clinical setting but I do think it offers 10 clear examples of real-life setbacks that many of us have faced.  Or might face sometime soon!  

Life is hard and from time to time it gets tougher.  If you're not as resilient as you think you might need to be, check out the links above and identify a couple of practical strategies for developing and maintaining your capacity to bounce back!



image:  Studio Cl Art at photl.com




1 Comment to Strategies for Enhancing Resilience - And a "Quick to Recover" Self-Test:

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diet plans on Tuesday, February 28, 2012 3:20 PM
I really enjoy reading this article. Hope that you would do great in upcoming time.A perfect post.
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